Publication: Natural coordinates for teaching multibody systems with Matlab
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Natural coordinates for teaching multibody systems with Matlab

- Part of a collection -
 

Area
Multibody Systems

Author(s)
Javier García de Jalón , Nobuyuki Shimizu , David Gómez

Published in
Proceedings of the ASME 2007 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference IDETC/CIE 2007, September 4--7, 2007, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Year
2007

Publisher
ASME

Abstract
This paper deals with teaching kinematic and dynamic analysis of 3-D multibody systems in a context of courses with severe time constraints and the objective of attaining practical abilities. This high course efficiency is intended by the use of a simple theoretical approach (the natural or fully Cartesian coordinates) and a high level programming language (the function rich and easy to learn development tool Matlab). The theoretical prerequisites for such a course can be kept to a minimum. This approach would allow the introduction of some lessons on multibody systems inside more general courses on machine dynamics. It can also be useful for short courses addressed to engineers in industry and for numerical analysis courses addressed to mechanical engineering students that are interested in practical applications of these numerical methods. In this paper the achievable theory level will be presented in detail by means of a practical but non trivial example: a closed-chain 3-D robot. Natural coordinates and Matlab are also a good starting point to present more advanced techniques such as numerical integration methods for ODEs and DAEs, or the not very well known automatic differentiation techniques. The latter is considered as a more advanced example in this paper.

AD Tools
ADiMat

BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{
         Jalon2007Ncf,
       author = "Javier Garc\'{\i}a de Jal\'{o}n and Nobuyuki Shimizu and
         David G\'{o}mez",
       title = "Natural coordinates for teaching multibody systems with {M}atlab",
       booktitle = "Proceedings of the ASME 2007 International Design Engineering Technical
         Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference {IDETC/CIE}~2007, September
         4--7, 2007, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA",
       year = "2007",
       volume = "5",
       series = "6th International Conference on Multibody Systems, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Control,
         Parts A, B, and C",
       isbn = "0-7918-4806-X",
       pages = "1539--1548",
       publisher = "ASME",
       url = "http://link.aip.org/link/abstract/ASMECP/v2007/i4806X/p1539/s1",
       ad_area = "Multibody Systems",
       ad_tools = "ADiMat",
       doi = "10.1115/DETC2007-35358",
       abstract = "This paper deals with teaching kinematic and dynamic analysis of 3-D multibody
         systems in a context of courses with severe time constraints and the objective of attaining
         practical abilities. This high course efficiency is intended by the use of a simple theoretical
         approach (the natural or fully Cartesian coordinates) and a high level programming language (the
         function rich and easy to learn development tool Matlab). The theoretical prerequisites for such a
         course can be kept to a minimum. This approach would allow the introduction of some lessons on
         multibody systems inside more general courses on machine dynamics. It can also be useful for short
         courses addressed to engineers in industry and for numerical analysis courses addressed to
         mechanical engineering students that are interested in practical applications of these numerical
         methods. In this paper the achievable theory level will be presented in detail by means of a
         practical but non trivial example: a closed-chain 3-D robot. Natural coordinates and Matlab are also
         a good starting point to present more advanced techniques such as numerical integration methods for
         ODEs and DAEs, or the not very well known automatic differentiation techniques. The latter is
         considered as a more advanced example in this paper."
}


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